12 Months Archive

  • McAfee and Carnegie Mellon Report Finds Serious Disconnect Between Businesses and Mobile Users

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. & PITTSBURGH–(BUSINESS WIRE)–McAfee today released “Mobility and Security: Dazzling Opportunities, Profound Challenges” , a global report focused on the consumerization of...

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  • NUS Provides Extra Help for New Graduates

    New graduates are being given Extra help in their first year out of study with a new career support themed discount card from NUS Extra. The Graduate Extra card is available to all those that have graduated in the last 12 months. It offers discounts...

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  • AT&T seals deal on Verizon’s divested Alltel markets

    AT&T seals deal on Verizon’s divested Alltel markets

    It took a good, long while, but AT&T has finally closed on its acquisition of the markets Verizon was required to divest in order to get the government to agree to its purchase of Alltel early last year. For most customers, the move has no practical impact -- the markets are mostly rural -- but for affected folks, it means that they'll be able to "select a device comparable to their existing device at no additional cost" as markets get upgraded over the course of the next 12 months. Interestingly, all of the markets will be getting the 3G treatment, a sharp departure from AT&T's typical strategy of keeping unpopulated areas on EDGE -- but it probably makes sense to get them up and running on 3G since the network's got to be built up from scratch anyhow. Follow the break for the full press release.

    Continue reading AT&T seals deal on Verizon's divested Alltel markets

    AT&T seals deal on Verizon's divested Alltel markets originally appeared on Engadget Mobile on Wed, 23 Jun 2010 03:47:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • TomTom Go Live 1000 blurs the line between PND and connected tablet

    TomTom Go Live 1000 blurs the line between PND and connected tablet

    The dedicated GPS market is slowly but steadily shrinking as smartphones gain the same abilities, but yet the major players keep rolling out new devices. The TomTom Go Live 1000 bucks the trend of a semi-smart connected device and instead adds a ton of storage on top of a powerful setup to run a WebKit-based UI along with a ton of connected apps. This just might be the PND we've been waiting for -- too bad it's a few years late.

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  • Don’t wear your watches in the shower or under water

    Don’t wear your watches in the shower or under water

    I always had a sneaking suspicion that I was doing something horrible to my watches by wearing them in water and now I know: almost nothing under the sun is truly waterproof. This older post by a watchmaker spells it out in plain English: most waterproof watches are, at best, not waterproof at all. Also, [...]

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  • Sharp announces world’s first four-primary-color, super-bright 3D LCD

    Sharp announces world’s first four-primary-color, super-bright 3D LCD

    We all know Sharp is particularly strong in the LCD panel space, which means it's not a big surprise the company is the first to announce a 3D LCD with four base colors (Sharp has added yellow to the usual trio of red, green and blue). The company also claims the new screen is about 80% brighter than conventional models, boasting the highest brightness in the industry.

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  • Tens of Millions of Mexicans May be Left Phoneless Come Saturday

    Tens of Millions of Mexicans May be Left Phoneless Come Saturday

    Around about a year ago, a law was passed in Mexico that would enforce compulsory registration of personal details to a mobile phone account. The idea behind it was to help fight crime (Batman style) by inhibiting the method of delivering ransom and extortion calls. Telcos were given 12 months to collect the personal details of their subscribers. Come Saturday, that 12 months will be up, and despite radio and television commercials urging mobile phone users to register their name and address via text message, around 30 million lines are still unregistered. There is a push from telcos to have the deadline extended by a further 12 months, but senators have thus far refused requests to do so.

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  • Verizon to FCC: hey, you said ETFs were okay!

    Verizon to FCC: hey, you said ETFs were okay!

    Even though the FCC just gave Verizon until Monday to respond to its inquiries regarding the company's new $350 "advanced device" early termination fee, they've shown some hustle here and delivered their 77 (yes, seventy-seven) page response today. Here are the two big takeaways consumers are going to care about:
    • The company justifies the advanced device ETF a couple ways; it starts out by referring to some 2003 statements by the FCC in which the Commission says that it doesn't support the concept of customers breaking contracts and that carriers have a right to recoup those fees. Of course, that really doesn't drive to the point here, which is that Verizon's now charging two completely different ETFs based on a rather arbitrary line in the sand drawn by Verizon; to that end, the carrier says that the additional cost it incurs to procure the devices on its advanced list is greater than the difference between the two ETFs ($175) on average. It also says that it needs that extra guaranteed revenue to keep its broadband network up to snuff, since advanced devices are more likely to strain it.
    • Regarding the weirdness at the end of the contract -- where a customer still owes $120 23 months into a two-year deal -- Verizon says that it's still losing money (read: we should be thankful they're prorating at all). As an example, it says that its average loss for a customer canceling 12 months into a contract is about double the $230 prorated ETF on an advanced device, and that statistically speaking, customers are far more likely to cancel early on than late. While we don't doubt that, we think they're trying to divert the conversation here just a bit.
    It's hard to say whether these responses are going to sate the FCC on the matter, but seeing how Verizon's showing no signs that it's interesting in changing its policies, this could still turn into a battle royale. Stay tuned -- something tells us this isn't the last we'll hear on the matter.

    [Thanks, Daniel P.]

    Verizon to FCC: hey, you said ETFs were okay! originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 18 Dec 2009 15:50:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • CrunchDeals: Xbox 360, Modern Warfare 2, 12 months of Xbox Live for $249

    CrunchDeals: Xbox 360, Modern Warfare 2, 12 months of Xbox Live for $249

    It's probably not a huge stretch to think that some people may very well be purchasing an Xbox 360 just to play Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. Wal-Mart knows this and, as such, is offering a pretty enticing deal: Xbox 360 Arcade console, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, and 12 months of Xbox Live Gold service for just $249.

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  • ASUS and Toshiba winners of reliability survey, don’t ask about HP

    ASUS and Toshiba winners of reliability survey, don’t ask about HP

    SquareTrade, proprietors of extended warranties, just released a 3-year study that sheds some light on the reliability of laptops and netbooks. The main conclusion that 1 in 3 notebooks fail within three year should come as no surprise. After all, they are portable computers that get banged around. It's the nature of the beast. However, the study does reveal some other interesting tid-bits, including a handy graph the shows the malfunction rate of the top nine laptop manufacturers.

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  • Airport Wi-Fi users tend to be well-off, rich folk

    Airport Wi-Fi users tend to be well-off, rich folk

    It's a good time to be an airport Wi-Fi advertiser. According to a study just released by JiWire, the folks behind a lot of airport Wi-Fi, most people that use airport W-iFi are loaded and spend a good amount of time online while waiting for their flight. This means, of course, that Mr. Money Bags has plenty of time to click on the flashing banner ads that airport Wi-Fi generally sports. But check out these stats, I'm in the wrong game. I should be selling airport Wi-Fi ads.

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  • Robovie-X: New glove-controlled, ambidextrous humanoid

    Robovie-X: New glove-controlled, ambidextrous humanoid

    Japan-based Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) and robot venture Vstone have announced the joint development of a mini humanoid [JP] that's able to handle objects dexterously through a remote control. The so-called Robovie-PC is already on sale in Japan and costs $4,500.

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  • Ooma Telo is here, let the free* calls begin

    Ooma Telo is here, let the free* calls begin

    Ooma might be onto something here. The VoIP provider is taking a different path with the Telo system: the phone calls are free. Like, you don't ever have to pay for calling your Mom. You can either use your own phones or the Ooma high-end DECT 6.0 handset. Sounds nice, eh? Too bad there's a huge admission price for the hardware.

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  • The PS3’s yellow light of death: Big deal, or sorta ‘meh’?

    The PS3’s yellow light of death: Big deal, or sorta ‘meh’?

    The BBC is running a piece about “the yellow light of death,” the PS3's equivalent of the Xbox 360's “red ring of death.” Well, perhaps the word “equivalent” isn't the right one to use, since, at least according to Sony, less than one half of one percent of PS3s sold in the UK have turned up bad.

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  • Hanappa: Sega Toys to offer yet another plant listening to your sorrows

    Hanappa: Sega Toys to offer yet another plant listening to your sorrows

    I blogged about Sega Toys' Pekoppa, the plant that listens and reacts to everything a person says, exactly 12 months ago. And the toy seems to have become a hit since then, as Sega Toys today announced the Hanappa, a Pekoppa 2 of sorts [JP, PDF].

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