Exposed Archive

  • iPhone 4’s seams explained, ready to solve AT&T call issues? (video)

    iPhone 4’s seams explained, ready to solve AT&T call issues? (video)

    When we first exposed the iPhone 4 to the world, many of you were skeptical about its authenticity. Frankly, so were we, initially anyway. A device with black seams disrupting its otherwise clean lines just couldn't be from Apple, a company notorious for its obsessive design aesthetic. Well, now that the iPhone 4 is official, Steve took a moment to explain that the stainless steel band is actually an integral part of the iPhone's antenna system -- one part dedicated to Bluetooth, WiFi, and GPS; the other larger half to UMTS and GSM. Something that, according to Steve, has never been done before in a phone. We'll have to wait a bit before we know whether this "brilliant engineering" translates into fewer dropped calls for frustrated AT&T customers. But it's hard to imagine that Apple would take the time to show its antennas to developers if there wasn't a downstream reward for consumers. Remember, Steve did say last week that things "should be getting a lot better soon" on AT&T. Click through to hear Apple's loyal software developers ooh and aah over the iPhone's really cool ability to convert electromagnetic radiation into electrical current, and back. Amazing.

    Continue reading iPhone 4's seams explained, ready to solve AT&T call issues? (video)

    iPhone 4's seams explained, ready to solve AT&T call issues? (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 08 Jun 2010 08:36:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • Windows Phone 7: technical tidbits exposed

    Windows Phone 7: technical tidbits exposed

    Windows Phone 7 architectural documents, the sordid details exposed
    We're in an interesting position with Windows Phone 7. We still don't know what devices will be running the OS nor indeed exactly when they'll be launching, but despite that we've already had the opportunity to spend quite a bit of quality time with not one but two separate versions of Microsoft's mobile revolution. And now, if that weren't enough, we've gained access to a series of detailed architectural documents about the OS courtesy of tweakers.net and HTCPedia.com, documents that detail everything from ringtones to device drivers. It's a couple-hundred pages of generally menial stuff, but there are quite a few nuggets of gold to be found in here, and we've dug them out just for you. Click on through, and let's see what we've got.

    Continue reading Windows Phone 7: technical tidbits exposed

    Windows Phone 7: technical tidbits exposed originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 24 May 2010 14:16:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • iPad innards exposed via X-ray

    iPad innards exposed via X-ray

    We here in Japan have to wait until next month for the iPad. For reasons unknown, that didn't stop a doctor living in Fukuoka (Southern Japan) from X-raying one he apparently imported from the US and posting the picture on his blog [JP]. See the result on the left.

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  • Churches (and others) will have to upgrade their mics right quick or the FCC will be very angry

    Churches (and others) will have to upgrade their mics right quick or the FCC will be very angry

    The absurdity of this issue, I swear. Get this: churches (and other deals like outdoor events) have been using microphones that operate on the 700MHz spectrum since, like, forever. It turns out that that part of the spectrum, 700MHz, is to be set aside for over-the-air digital TV broadcasts. You see where this is going: churches all over the country are going to have to upgrade their microphones, sound systems, etc. lest they run afoul of the law come June, 2010. You'd think God would have warned them about this.

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  • Jailbroken iPhones exposed to second worm, this time malicious

    Jailbroken iPhones exposed to second worm, this time malicious

    As inevitable as the sun rising in the East and setting in the West, an innocuous iPhone worm has been transformed into a malicious bank details-stealing virus. The second recorded iPhone infection operates on exactly the same principles as the first, as it targets jailbroken handsets with SSH installed, but this time adds the ability for the hacker to remotely control and access the phone. By throwing up a purported ING Direct login page, he (or she, or they) can collect your online banking credentials and, presumably, all the cash they are supposed to protect. Presently isolated within the Netherlands, this outbreak may spread further still, as it is capable of infecting other jailbroken iPhones on the same WiFi network.

    Jailbroken iPhones exposed to second worm, this time malicious originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 23 Nov 2009 06:40:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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  • New spongy material instantly hardens on exposure to magnetism

    New spongy material instantly hardens on exposure to magnetism

    A new kind of material (of which currently no actual picture exists anywhere) with the consistency of pudding that hardens instantly when exposed to magnetism has been developed by a team of researchers at Japan's Yamagata University. And once the substance, a mix between high polymer and iron oxide granules, hardens, it can become up to 500 times stiffer than plastic.

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  • Facebook App Developer To Apple: Tear Down This App Store Wall

    Facebook App Developer To Apple: Tear Down This App Store Wall

    Apple has been working overtime recently to right some of the App Store wrongs, led by none other than Senior VP Phil Schiller. And having exposed some App Store approval process secrets in its letter to the FCC, everything should be all hunky dory in the App Store now, right? Wrong. It's hard to remember an app in recent memory that has been anticipated more than Facebook's new 3.0 version of its iPhone app. How do I know? You should see my Facebook inbox from people who have hunted me down knowing that I have it since I reviewed it. Unfortunately, I can't give it to anyone because it's a version tied specifically to my iPhone (so stop emailing!). It's been a week and a half since Facebook engineer Joe Hewitt submitted the app to the App Store, and the wait time frustration is not only getting to the users, but to Hewitt himself, as he made clear in a blog post tonight. Simply put, Hewitt's post is a must-read because he makes a range of excellent points in a fairly condensed space. We'll simply highlight some of the larger ones.

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  • App Store Exposed: Notes Of Interest From Apple’s Statement To The FCC

    App Store Exposed: Notes Of Interest From Apple’s Statement To The FCC

    Now that all of the letters to the FCC have been filed by Apple, AT&T and Google, we're more carefully reading them over for interesting details. The Apple letter would seem to have the most interesting information, as it controls the App Store, and has given some new information about it. Here are some interesting tidbits. On general app rejections:
    We created an approval process that reviews every application submitted to Apple for the App Store in order to protect consumer privacy, safeguard children from inappropriate content, and avoid applications that degrade the core experience of the iPhone. Some types of content such as pornography are rejected outright from the App Store, while others such as graphic combat scenes in action games may be approved but with an appropriate age rating. Most rejections are based on bugs found in the applications. When there is an issue, we try to provide the developer with helpful feedback so they can modify the application in order for us to approve it.

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  • New kind of shape-memory plastic that’s moldable at room temperature

    New kind of shape-memory plastic that’s moldable at room temperature

    NEC has developed a shape-memory plastic that can be formed at room temperature . The plastic can be heated and cooled, remaining pliant for for several minutes during which it can be processed. The usual problem with shape-memory plastics is differences in temperature. Shape-memory plastics that needs to be hardened at high temperatures may burn users, while those that need be kept at low temperatures lose their shape when exposed to heat.

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