Handset Manufacturers Archive

  • Study Finds “Out-of-Touch” Battery-Specs Are Leaving Consumers Powerless to Compare

    POOLE, England–(BUSINESS WIRE)–An analysis of 50 of the top smartphones launched from August 2011 to August 2012 reveals that smartphone makers are risking customer satisfaction by not quoting battery performance in...

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  • MasterCard Certifies NFC Phones from HTC, Intel, LG Electronics, Nokia, RIM, Samsung Electronics and Sony

    MasterCard Certifies NFC Phones from HTC, Intel, LG Electronics, Nokia, RIM, Samsung Electronics and Sony

    PURCHASE, N.Y.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–MasterCard Worldwide today announced several near field communications (NFC) enabled smartphones have been certified for use with MasterCard PayPass® technology, providing consumers with devices capable of making fast, ...

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  • Intertrust and HTC Announce Strategic Technology Partnership

    SUNNYVALE, Calif., & TAOYUAN, Taiwan–(BUSINESS WIRE)–As part of a strategic initiative to improve the robustness, privacy and security of Android and Windows Phone mobile devices, Intertrust Technologies Corporation, the world’s leading...

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  • Surprise! HTC Legend pre-orders delivered a bit early

    Surprise! HTC Legend pre-orders delivered a bit early

    Handset manufacturers are usually pretty good about holding their tongue about specific release dates until the launch date is a sure thing, so it’s not too often that we see delays in the mobile world. What’s even more rare than a delay, however, is something shipping way earlier than expected. And yet, that seems to be [...]

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  • Video: Opera Mobile running on the Nexus One

    Video: Opera Mobile running on the Nexus One

    We had a brief chat with Opera Software product analyst Phillip Grønvold here at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona on Tuesday. We had a conversation about the company's plans to submit an Opera Mini iPhone app up for App Store approval, of which we posted the video interview yesterday. Another thing we touched upon was the recently announced plans to provide handset manufacturers with a toolkit to get the company's Opera Mobile product preloaded on Android devices. Grønvold demoed the app running on Google's Nexus One phone, and we recorded the video of the app in action.

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  • ST-Ericsson’s new platform could spawn heaps of low-cost Android smartphones

    ST-Ericsson’s new platform could spawn heaps of low-cost Android smartphones

    ST-Ericsson, a 50/50 joint venture by STMicroelectronics and Ericsson, this morning announced its latest HSDPA platform built on the Linux OS. Dubbed U6715, the platform aims to aid handset manufacturers produce smartphones powered by Android - or other Linux-based operating systems - with a wholesale price of less than €100 ($138). ST-Ericsson says it anticipates manufacturers to launch the first commercial products based on its U6715 chip platform in the first half of 2010.

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  • Get Ready For The Google Branded Chrome OS Netbook

    Get Ready For The Google Branded Chrome OS Netbook

    Most of the tech world now considers it a given that Google will be selling its own unlocked phone, called the Nexus One, to customers directly early in 2010. A few stragglers are still debating the finer points of the difference between Google working with handset manufacturers and carriers on a good Android experience v. them dictating the hardware specs and selling it directly to users. While they work that out for themselves we're off to the next story - the Google Chrome OS Netbook (although we think Google has a few surprises left around the Nexus One, too). Google has said from the beginning that they plan on working with select manufacturers to ensure a good Chrome OS experience for users when devices first hit the market next year. From an early FAQ: "The Google Chrome OS team is currently working with a number of technology companies to design and build devices that deliver an extraordinary end user experience. Among others, these companies include Acer, Adobe, ASUS, Freescale, Hewlett-Packard, Lenovo, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments, and Toshiba." Most people assume that "working with" around Chrome OS means the same thing as "working with" around Android - lots of meetings to make sure the devices and software work together as well as possible. But sometimes those pesky hardware guys just don't do things quite right. And when you're competing against Apple, everything most definitely needs to be quite right. That may explain why Google has, according to multiple sources, been talking to at least one hardware manufacturer about building a netbook for Google directly. As in Google gave the company a RFP with quite detailed technical specifications and has begun discussions on building it.

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  • Android Market grows up, hits 20,000 apps milestone

    Android Market grows up, hits 20,000 apps milestone

    Rest assured that 2010 is going to be a big year for the Android operating system, with many new handsets finding their way to stores around the world (including Google's own phone) and an increasing amount of developers building tools, games and the likes for the fast-growing platform. One way of noticing that the OS is poised for a big breakthrough at the expense of Windows Mobile, Symbian and other operating systems designed to run on various mobile devices, is the number of applications already available for download in the platform's own application store, Android Market. Lo and behold, that number hit the 20,000 milestone just moments ago, a little over 5 months since it reached 10,000 apps.

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  • The Google Phone May Be Data Only, VoIP Driven Device

    The Google Phone May Be Data Only, VoIP Driven Device

    Yesterday we wrote about the soon to launch Google Phone, a Google branded Android phone that we believe will hit the market in early 2010. Lots of people are saying there's no way Google will enter the phone market directly and compete with all these handset manufacturers who have bet on Android. Daring Fireball, PC World and InfoMobile are among the doubters. And a lot of people are pointing to a Tom Krazit/CNET article last month that quoted Google's Andy Rubin: "We're not making hardware...We're enabling other people to build hardware," and "Rubin, vice president of engineering for Android at Google, scoffed at the notion that the company would "compete with its customers" by releasing its own phone."

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  • iPhone gets official government approval in South Korea

    iPhone gets official government approval in South Korea

    sk-iphone A little while back, we wrote about the Korea Communications Commission's decision to make an exception for the iPhone, essentially clearing the way for Apple to submit the phone for radio approval (a la FCC procedures in the States). Now, two months later, the KCC has officially approved Apple's iPhone for sale in South Korea.

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  • It’s Google’s world and handset makers just live in it

    It’s Google’s world and handset makers just live in it

    When the Motorola Droid launched this month everyone was amazed that a company so down on its luck was able to put together a well-designed phone running a powerful, "brand new" OS. The whole package - hardware, software, and marketing - seemed flawless. In fact, phones running Android 1.5 now look hopelessly outdated and with 2.0's gesture, CDMA, and search support you'd wonder why handset manufacturers like HTC, LG, Kyocera, and Samsung are using 1.5 at all. The reasons have more to do with Google than any decision on the carriers' part. In fact, according to a source close to the handset business, Google's Android team directly assisted Motorola and Verizon in building the Droid's software from the ground up and is currently assisting another, unknown, handset maker in Korea to create a finely-tuned hardware and software combination. Most important, however, is that this is sort of assistance most manufacturers do not receive and, in the end, they are dinged for running an "older" version of Android.

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  • Android 2.0 source released, already ported to the G1

    Android 2.0 source released, already ported to the G1

    While Android 2.0 has been floating around on Motorola DROIDs for over a week now, one important chunk of it has been under lock-and-key: the source. Even amongst manufacturing partners, we’re told, Google hasn’t been completely open; outside of Motorola (and more recently, HTC), most of the other handset manufacturers have been left out in [...]

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  • Qualcomm releases first batch of next year’s chips

    Qualcomm releases first batch of next year’s chips

    Qualcomm, one of the largest fabless mobile chip manufactures in the world, has announced the availability of samples of its next-gen dual-carrier HSPA+ and multi-mode 3G/LTE chipsets. Hello Future! So, what’s the big deal? According to Qualcomm, These chipsets demonstrate significant progress toward enabling the mass-market commercial deployment of two next-generation network technologies that bring more advanced [...]

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  • Why the Droid Eris is not running Android 2.0

    Why the Droid Eris is not running Android 2.0

    Another day, another Android phone. I believe we will soon come to a day when Android phones will be looked at with the same jaundiced eye as, say, the latest LG Chocolate, but since that day hasn't come, I'll share a few observations with Verizon's new $99 Hero-alike, the Eris. The Eris is basically a mini Hero. It's slightly thinner and clad in all black and but the Sense UI is in place and all of the things that made the Hero great - responsive OS, apps, and social networking connectivity - are here. One thing lacking, however, is the "latest" version of Android with its superior navigation application and multi-touch.

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  • The Droid is coming, and it brought friends

    The Droid is coming, and it brought friends

    Chalk this one up as a rumor, but it's looking like Droid is going to be an army, rather then a lone warrior. There's been some rumblings that at least other handset manufacturers are creating their own Droids as well.

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